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  • University of Puget Sound
Abstract Algebra: Theory and Applications
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This text is intended for a one- or two-semester undergraduate course in abstract algebra. Traditionally, these courses have covered the theoretical aspects of groups, rings, and fields. However, with the development of computing in the last several decades, applications that involve abstract algebra and discrete mathematics have become increasingly important, and many science, engineering, and computer science students are now electing to minor in mathematics. Though theory still occupies a central role in the subject of abstract algebra and no student should go through such a course without a good notion of what a proof is, the importance of applications such as coding theory and cryptography has grown significantly.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Puget Sound
Author:
Thomas Judson
Date Added:
01/01/2016
A First Course in Linear Algebra
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A First Course in Linear Algebra is an introductory textbook aimed at college-level sophomores and juniors. Typically students will have taken calculus, but it is not a prerequisite. The book begins with systems of linear equations, then covers matrix algebra, before taking up finite-dimensional vector spaces in full generality. The final chapter covers matrix representations of linear transformations, through diagonalization, change of basis and Jordan canonical form. Determinants and eigenvalues are covered along the way.

Subject:
Mathematics
Algebra
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Puget Sound
Author:
Robert Beezer
Date Added:
12/05/2019
Music Theory for the 21st-Century Classroom
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Educational Use
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Music Theory for the 21st–Century Classroom is an openly–licensed online four–semester college music theory textbook. This text differs from other music theory textbooks by focusing less on four–part (SATB) voiceleading and more on relating harmony to the phrase. Also, in traditional music theory textbooks, there is little emphasis on motivic analysis and analysis of melodic units smaller than the phrase. In my opinion, this led to students having difficulty with creating melodies, since the training they are given is typically to write a “melody” in quarter notes in the soprano voice of part writing exercises. When the assignments in those texts ask students to do more than this, the majority of the students struggle to create a melody with continuity and with appropriate placement of harmonies within a phrase because the text had not prepared them to do so.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Puget Sound
Author:
Robert Hutchinson
Date Added:
11/18/2021