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Introduction to Sociology 2e
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CC BY
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Introduction to Sociology 2e adheres to the scope and sequence of a typical, one-semester introductory sociology course. It offers comprehensive coverage of core concepts, foundational scholars, and emerging theories, which are supported by a wealth of engaging learning materials. The textbook presents detailed section reviews with rich questions, discussions that help students apply their knowledge, and features that draw learners into the discipline in meaningful ways. The second edition retains the book’s conceptual organization, aligning to most courses, and has been significantly updated to reflect the latest research and provide examples most relevant to today’s students. In order to help instructors transition to the revised version, the 2e changes are described within the preface.

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
02/21/2020
Introduction to Sociology 2e, Race and Ethnicity, Intergroup Relationships
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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This module explains different intergroup relations in terms of their relative levels of tolerance, and provides historical and/or contemporary examples of each type of intergroup relation.

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Mindy Boland
Date Added:
02/21/2020
PBS Soundbreaking, Lesson 13: The Beat as an Object of Celebration and Concern in Segregation-Era America
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

As the lesson unfolds, students will get to investigate some of the ways listeners feel and relate to rhythms, focusing on the language used to describe "the beat," and the manners in which rhythms connect to a deeper past and seem to anticipate particular futures. If "the beat" was a concern in 1950s America, it was again a concern for some, decades later, when Gangsta Rap began to dominate the Billboard charts. How far have we come? And how can we study the past to learn more about the future we're making and the music we'll make it with? This lesson gets to the heart of the conflicts that arise as particular rhythms get made, released, listened to, and loved.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
07/02/2021