Course Mapping

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All resources in Course Mapping

Anatomy and Physiology of Animals

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Veterinary nurses need to have a firm grasp of the normal structure of an animal’s body and how it functions before they can understand the effect diseases and injuries have and the best ways to treat them. This book describes the structure of the animal body and the way in which it works. Animals encountered in normal veterinary practice are used as examples where possible.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Ruth Lawson

Microscope and Cell

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This is a totally online lab teaching the use of the microscope and basic structure of the cell. There are 8 sections covered: Section 1 : Purpose of the Microscope Section 2 : Compound Microscope Section 3 : Viewing Microscope Slides Section 4 : Depth of Focus Section 5 : Microscopic Measurement Section 6 : Cells Section 7 : Prokaryotic Cells Section 8 : Eukaryotic Cells

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Reading

Nutrition (NUTR 101)

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NUTR& 101 is a nutrition course designed for science majors. It emphasizes the key nutritional concepts that students going into health care need to learn. It addresses the biochemical underlying causes of heart disease, stroke and diabetes due to lack of appropriate nutrition and exercise. It also details the digestive process, the digestion and absorption of macro and micronutrients including vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. The course also examines the role of cultural factors, biochemical signals and psychological factors such as stress in eating habits. Various diets and overall metabolism are covered in relation to their effect on health. Nutrition for special populations is also discussed.

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Reading, Syllabus

Principles of Biology

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This textbook is designed specifically for Kansas State's Biology 198 Class. The course is taught using the studio approach and based on active learning. The studio manual contains all of the learning objectives for each class period and is the record of all student activities. Hence, this textbook is more of a reference tool while the studio manual is the learning tool.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Bruce Snyder, Christopher Herren, David Rintoul, Eva Horne, Martha Smith-Caldas, Robert Bear

An Introduction to Nutrition v1.0

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Textbook written by Community College and University faculty for non-majors in Nutrition using science and evidence based nutritional science information. This version was accessible in 2012. Material covers basic definitions, and nutrition related to healthy diet and the human body. Separate chapters on carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nutrients for fluid and electrolyte balance, antioxidants, bone health, metabolism, body weight and the life cycle. Special features to aid in instruction for each chapter include: The “Learning Objectives”, “Big Idea” related to chapter themes, “Key Takeaways” and a “You decide” challenge to think about how topics relate to student’s life. “Discussion Starters”, “Videos” and “Exercises” are provided as well as links to choosemyplate.gov and other sources.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Beth Snow, Maureen Zimmerman

General Chemistry Lab Spring

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OpenStax General Chemistry Lab covers: 1 Practical Examples of the Gas Laws 2 Colligative Properties and Ice Cream 3 Pervasive Polymers 4 Determine the Value of an Equilibrium Constant by Complex Ion Formation 5 indigestion? Which is the Best Commercial Antacid? 6 Acid and Bases to Buffers 7 Forensics 8 The Curious Case of Catalase 9 Organic Reactions 10 Kitchen Synthesis of Nanorust 11 Electrochemistry and Alchemy 12 From Cells and Electrodes to Golden Pennies 13 Amphoteric Aluminum 14 Crystal Violet Kinetics

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Mary McHale

Analytical Chemistry 2.1

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As currently taught in the United States, introductory courses in analytical chemistryemphasize quantitative (and sometimes qualitative) methods of analysis along with a heavydose of equilibrium chemistry. Analytical chemistry, however, is much more than a collection ofanalytical methods and an understanding of equilibrium chemistry; it is an approach to solvingchemical problems. Although equilibrium chemistry and analytical methods are important, theircoverage should not come at the expense of other equally important topics. The introductory course in analytical chemistry is the ideal place in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum forexploring topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization,optimization, statistics, and the validation of experimental results. Analytical methods comeand go, but best practices for designing and validating analytical methods are universal. Becausechemistry is an experimental science it is essential that all chemistry students understand theimportance of making good measurements. My goal in preparing this textbook is to find a more appropriate balance between theoryand practice, between “classical” and “modern” analytical methods, between analyzing samplesand collecting samples and preparing them for analysis, and between analytical methods anddata analysis. There is more material here than anyone can cover in one semester; it is myhope that the diversity of topics will meet the needs of different instructors, while, perhaps,suggesting some new topics to cover.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: David Harvey

Compact Anthology of World Literature

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The introductions in this anthology are meant to be just that: a basic overview of what students need to know before they begin reading, with topics that students can research further. An open access literature textbook cannot be a history book at the same time, but history is the great companion of literature: The more history students know, the easier it is for them to interpret literature.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Kyounghye Kwon, Laura Getty

English Literature: Victorians and Moderns

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English Literature: Victorians and Moderns is an anthology that provides annotated teaching editions of many of the most frequently-taught classics of Victorian and Modern poetry, fiction, and drama. Additionally, it also provides a series of guided research casebooks, which make available numerous published essays from open access books and journals, as well as several reprinted critical essays from established learned journals such as English Studies in Canada and the Aldous Huxley Annual with the permission of the authors and editors. Designed to supplement the annotated complete texts of three famous short novels: Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw, Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, each casebook offers cross-disciplinary guided research topics which will encourage majors in fields other than English to undertake topics in diverse areas, including History, Economics, Anthropology, Political Science, Biology, and Psychology. Selections have also been included to encourage topical, thematic, and generic cross-referencing. Students will also be exposed to a wide range of approaches, including new-critical, psychoanalytic, historical, and feminist.

Material Type: Reading, Textbook

Authors: Camosun College, Dr. James Sexton

Naming the Unnameable: An Approach to Poetry for New Generations

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Informed by a writing philosophy that values both spontaneity and discipline, Michelle Bonczek Evory’s Naming the Unnameable: An Approach to Poetry for New Generations offers practical advice and strategies for developing a writing process that is centered on play and supported by an understanding of America’s rich literary traditions. With consideration to the psychology of invention, Bonczek Evory provides students with exercises aimed to make writing in its early stages a form of play that gives way to more enriching insights through revision, embracing the writing of poetry as both a love of language and a tool that enables us to explore ourselves and better understand the world. The volume includes resources for students seeking to publish and build a writing-centered lifestyle or career. Poets featured range in age, subject, and style, and many are connected to colleges in the State University of New York system. Naming the Unnameable promotes an understanding of poetry as a living art of which students are a part, and provides ways for students to involve themselves in the growing contemporary poetry community that thrives in America today.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Michelle Bonczek Evory

Argument & Critical Thinking

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In this learning area, you will learn how to develop an argumentative essay and stronger critical thinking skills. This learning area will help you develop your arguments, understand your audience, evaluate source material, approach arguments rhetorically, and avoid logical fallacies. Here, you’ll also learn about evaluating other arguments and creating digital writing projects related to your argument.

Material Type: Module

Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing Volume 2

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Volumes in Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing offer multiple perspectives on a wide-range of topics about writing. In each chapter, authors present their unique views, insights, and strategies for writing by addressing the undergraduate reader directly. Drawing on their own experiences, these teachers-as-writers invite students to join in the larger conversation about the craft of writing. Consequently, each essay functions as a standalone text that can easily complement other selected readings in writing or writing-intensive courses across the disciplines at any level.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Charles Lowe, Pavel Zemliansky

The Open Access Companion to the Canterbury Tales – A new way to learn about old books

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The Open Access Companion to the Canterbury Tales (OACCT) is a volume of introductory chapters for first-time, university-level readers of Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. The chapters have been created and edited by professional scholars of Chaucer, and all material is released open access and free of charge for classroom, scholarly, and personal use. There are two kinds of material available here. Essay chapters explore each of the tales in relation to an engaging topic of broad general interest, while reference chapters provide key context and tools for understanding the Canterbury Tales and its time period. In the future, more material will be added to this project: teaching resources, reader contributions, and new essay chapters that consider tales from additional viewpoints and in relation to different topics.

Material Type: Reading

Author: Candace Barrington

DALA Digital American Literature Anthology

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The Digital American Literature Anthology is a free, online textbook that surveys American literature from its beginnings to the early twentieth century. It is available in multiple digital formats, though specifically designed for tablets, laptops, and e-readers. The textbook has links to unit introductions, and multiple supplemental online resources.

Material Type: Primary Source, Reading, Textbook

Author: Michael O'Conner

Compact Anthology of World Literature II: Volumes 4, 5, and 6

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Although the text is designed to look like an actual book, the Table of Contents is composed of hyperlinks that will take you to each introductory section and then to each text. The three parts of the text are organized into the following units: Part 4—The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Unit I: The Age of Reason Unit II: The Near East and Asia Part 5—The Long Nineteenth Century Unit I Romanticism Unit II Realism Part 6—The Twentieth Century and Contemporary Literature Unit I Modernism Unit II Postcolonial Literature Unit III Contemporary Literature Texts from a variety of genres and cultures are included in each unit. Additionally, each selection or collection includes a brief introduction about the author and text(s), and each includes 3 – 5 discussion questions. Texts in the public domain--those published or translated before 1923--are replicated here. Texts published or translated after 1923 are not yet available in the public domain. In those cases, we have provided a link to a stable site that includes the text. Thus, in Part 6, most of the texts are accessible in the form of links to outside sites. In every case, we have attempted to connect to the most stable links available.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Anita Turlington, Karen Dodson, Laura Getty, Laura Ng, Matthew Horton

Publishing Blackness: Textual Constructions of Race Since 1850

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From the white editorial authentication of slave narratives, to the cultural hybridity of the Harlem Renaissance, to the overtly independent publications of the Black Arts Movement, to the commercial power of Oprah's Book Club, African American textuality has been uniquely shaped by the contests for cultural power inherent in literary production and distribution. Always haunted by the commodification of blackness, African American literary production interfaces with the processes of publication and distribution in particularly charged ways. An energetic exploration of the struggles and complexities of African American print culture, this collection ranges across the history of African American literature, and the authors have much to contribute on such issues as editorial and archival preservation, canonization, and the "packaging" and repackaging of black-authored texts. Publishing Blackness aims to project African Americanist scholarship into the discourse of textual scholarship, provoking further work in a vital area of literary study.

Material Type: Reading, Textbook

The Black Arts Enterprise and the Production of African American Poetry

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The outpouring of creative expression known as the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s spawned a burgeoning number of black-owned cultural outlets, including publishing houses, performance spaces, and galleries. Central to the movement were its poets, who in concert with editors, visual artists, critics, and fellow writers published a wide range of black verse and advanced new theories and critical approaches for understanding African American literary art.

Material Type: Reading, Textbook

Author: Howard Rambsy II

ENGL 300 - Lecture 21 - African-American Criticism

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In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry examines trends in African-American criticism through the lens of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Toni Morrison. A brief history of African-American literature and criticism is undertaken, and the relationship of both to feminist theory is explicated. The problems in cultural and identity studies of essentialism, “the identity queue,” expropriation, and biology are surveyed, with particular attention paid to the work of Michael Cooke and Morrison’s reading of Huckleberry Finn. At the lecture’s conclusion, the tense relationship between African-American studies and New Critical assumptions are explored with reference to Robert Penn Warren’s poem, “Pondy Woods.”

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Paul Fry