Course Mapping

A group for those working on mapping OER to courses at Virginia institutions of higher education.
14 Members | 540 Affiliated resources

All resources in Course Mapping

Chemistry: Atoms First

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Chemistry: Atoms First is a peer-reviewed, openly licensed introductory textbook produced through a collaborative publishing partnership between OpenStax and the University of Connecticut and UConn Undergraduate Student Government Association. This title is an adaptation of the OpenStax Chemistry text and covers scope and sequence requirements of the two-semester general chemistry course. Reordered to fit an atoms first approach, this title introduces atomic and molecular structure much earlier than the traditional approach, delaying the introduction of more abstract material so students have time to acclimate to the study of chemistry. Chemistry: Atoms First also provides a basis for understanding the application of quantitative principles to the chemistry that underlies the entire course.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Allison Soult, Andrew Eklund, Carol Martinez, Donald Carpenetti, Don Frantz, Edward J. Neth, Emad El-Giar, George Kaminski, Jason Powell, Jennifer Look, Klaus Theopold, Mark Blaser, Paul Flowers, Paul Hooker, Richard Langley, Simon Bott, Thomas Sorenson, Troy Milliken, Vicki Moravec, William R. Robinson

Analytical Chemistry

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Analytical chemistry spans nearly all areas of chemistry but involves the development of tools and methods to measure physical properties of substances and apply those techniques to the identification of their presence (qualitative analysis) and quantify the amount present (quantitative analysis) of species in a wide variety of settings.

Material Type: Module, Textbook

Analytical Chemistry 2.1

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As currently taught in the United States, introductory courses in analytical chemistryemphasize quantitative (and sometimes qualitative) methods of analysis along with a heavydose of equilibrium chemistry. Analytical chemistry, however, is much more than a collection ofanalytical methods and an understanding of equilibrium chemistry; it is an approach to solvingchemical problems. Although equilibrium chemistry and analytical methods are important, theircoverage should not come at the expense of other equally important topics. The introductory course in analytical chemistry is the ideal place in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum forexploring topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization,optimization, statistics, and the validation of experimental results. Analytical methods comeand go, but best practices for designing and validating analytical methods are universal. Becausechemistry is an experimental science it is essential that all chemistry students understand theimportance of making good measurements. My goal in preparing this textbook is to find a more appropriate balance between theoryand practice, between “classical” and “modern” analytical methods, between analyzing samplesand collecting samples and preparing them for analysis, and between analytical methods anddata analysis. There is more material here than anyone can cover in one semester; it is myhope that the diversity of topics will meet the needs of different instructors, while, perhaps,suggesting some new topics to cover.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: David Harvey

Compact Anthology of World Literature

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The introductions in this anthology are meant to be just that: a basic overview of what students need to know before they begin reading, with topics that students can research further. An open access literature textbook cannot be a history book at the same time, but history is the great companion of literature: The more history students know, the easier it is for them to interpret literature.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Kyounghye Kwon, Laura Getty

English Composition 2

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Composition 2 is an expository writing course requiring more advanced writing skills than Composition 1, yet reviewing and incorporating some of the same skills. This course teaches research skills by emphasizing the development of advanced analytical/critical reading skills, proficiency in investigative research, and the writing of persuasive prose including documented and researched argumentative essays. A major component of this course will be an emphasis on the research process and information literacy.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Survey of English Literature I

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English Literature I is a survey of English literature from Old English poetry to works of the Restoration and early Romanticism. The course covers important concepts and developments of the English literary tradition while helping students to refine their critical reading and writing skills. Includes primary texts (many accompanied by video/audio options), historical analysis, and literary criticism.

Material Type: Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Reading

Author: Wendy Howard Gray

Technical Writing

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A focus on the organization, development, and refinement of technical communications.  Internal and external communications, including letters, memos, reports, and presentations are included.

Material Type: Textbook

American Literature I

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This course is a survey of American Literature from 1650 through 1820. It covers Early American and Puritan Literature, Enlightenment Literature, and Romantic Literature. It teaches in the context of American History and introduces the student to literary criticism and research.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Rhetorical Styles

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In the Rhetorical Styles area of the Excelsior OWL, you’ll learn about different rhetorical styles or, essentially, different strategies for developing your essays and other writing assignments. These basic strategies are not all encompassing but will provide you with a foundation and a flexibility to help you as you engage in writing assignments in your introductory writing classes and beyond.

Material Type: Module

Developing Writers in Higher Education

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For undergraduates following any course of study, it is essential to develop the ability to write effectively. Yet the processes by which students become more capable and ready to meet the challenges of writing for employers, the wider public, and their own purposes remain largely invisible. Developing Writers in Higher Education shows how learning to write for various purposes in multiple disciplines leads college students to new levels of competence. This volume draws on an in-depth study of the writing and experiences of 169 University of Michigan undergraduates, using statistical analysis of 322 surveys, qualitative analysis of 131 interviews, use of corpus linguistics on 94 electronic portfolios and 2,406 pieces of student writing, and case studies of individual students to trace the multiple paths taken by student writers. Topics include student writers’ interaction with feedback; perceptions of genre; the role of disciplinary writing; generality and certainty in student writing; students’ concepts of voice and style; students’ understanding of multimodal and digital writing; high school’s influence on college writers; and writing development after college. The digital edition offers samples of student writing, electronic portfolios produced by student writers, transcripts of interviews with students, and explanations of some of the analysis conducted by the contributors. This is an important book for researchers and graduate students in multiple fields. Those in writing studies get an overview of other longitudinal studies as well as key questions currently circulating. For linguists, it demonstrates how corpus linguistics can inform writing studies. Scholars in higher education will gain a new perspective on college student development. The book also adds to current understandings of sociocultural theories of literacy and offers prospective teachers insights into how students learn to write. Finally, for high school teachers, this volume will answer questions about college writing. Anne Ruggles Gere is Director of the Sweetland Center for Writing, Professor of English, and Professor of Education at the University of Michigan.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Anne Ruggles Gere Editor

The Open Access Companion to the Canterbury Tales – A new way to learn about old books

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The Open Access Companion to the Canterbury Tales (OACCT) is a volume of introductory chapters for first-time, university-level readers of Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. The chapters have been created and edited by professional scholars of Chaucer, and all material is released open access and free of charge for classroom, scholarly, and personal use. There are two kinds of material available here. Essay chapters explore each of the tales in relation to an engaging topic of broad general interest, while reference chapters provide key context and tools for understanding the Canterbury Tales and its time period. In the future, more material will be added to this project: teaching resources, reader contributions, and new essay chapters that consider tales from additional viewpoints and in relation to different topics.

Material Type: Reading

Author: Candace Barrington

Publishing Blackness: Textual Constructions of Race Since 1850

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From the white editorial authentication of slave narratives, to the cultural hybridity of the Harlem Renaissance, to the overtly independent publications of the Black Arts Movement, to the commercial power of Oprah's Book Club, African American textuality has been uniquely shaped by the contests for cultural power inherent in literary production and distribution. Always haunted by the commodification of blackness, African American literary production interfaces with the processes of publication and distribution in particularly charged ways. An energetic exploration of the struggles and complexities of African American print culture, this collection ranges across the history of African American literature, and the authors have much to contribute on such issues as editorial and archival preservation, canonization, and the "packaging" and repackaging of black-authored texts. Publishing Blackness aims to project African Americanist scholarship into the discourse of textual scholarship, provoking further work in a vital area of literary study.

Material Type: Reading, Textbook

The Black Arts Enterprise and the Production of African American Poetry

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The outpouring of creative expression known as the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s spawned a burgeoning number of black-owned cultural outlets, including publishing houses, performance spaces, and galleries. Central to the movement were its poets, who in concert with editors, visual artists, critics, and fellow writers published a wide range of black verse and advanced new theories and critical approaches for understanding African American literary art.

Material Type: Reading, Textbook

Author: Howard Rambsy II

American Women's Literature, 1847 to 1922

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LibriVox recording of a collection of 20 short stories and long-form poetry by American women writers. (Summary by BellonaTimes) Includes selections from Mary E. Wilkins, Kate Chopin, Louisa May Alcott, Alice Dunbar, Willa Cather, Lola Ridge, Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman, Fannie Hurst, Zitkala-Sa, Amy Lowell, Hilda Doolittle, Elinor Wylie, Lucretia P. Hale, Edna Ferber, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Lydia Maria Child, Sara Teasdale, Susan Fenimore Cooper, and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps. For further information, including links to online text, reader information, RSS feeds, CD cover or other formats (if available), please go to the LibriVox catalog page for this recording. For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox.org. Download M4B (168MB)

Material Type: Reading

Authors: Alice Dunbar, Amy Lowell, and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edna Ferber, Elinor Wylie, Fannie Hurst, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Hilda Doolittle, Kate Chopin, Lola Ridge, Louisa May Alcott, Lucretia P. Hale, Lydia Maria Child, Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman, Mary E. Wilkins, Sara Teasdale, Susan Fenimore Cooper, Willa Cather, Zitkala-Sa

Writing Commons

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Writing Commons aspires to be a community for writers, a creative learning space for students in courses that require college-level writing, a creative, interactive space for teachers to share resources and pedagogy. The primary goal of the resource is to provide the resources that students need to improve their writing, particularly students enrolled in courses that require college-level writing. The site provides free access to a college textbook that was published by a major publisher and awarded the Distinguished Book Award by Computers and Composition: an International Journal.

Material Type: Textbook